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Young investigators (left to right): Dr. Katherine Joy, former postdoc in the Center for Lunar Science and Exploration, now at the University of Manchester; Ms. Jessica Barnes, a former participant in the CLSE Lunar Exploration Intern Program, currently finishing her Ph.D. at the Open University; Ms. Natalie Curran, another former participant in the CLSE Lunar Exploration Intern Program, currently working on her Ph.D. at the University of Manchester; and Ms. Jane MacArthur, a former participant in our Short Course and Field School at the Sudbury Impact Structure, currently working on her M.S. at University College London. The young scientists are bracketed by a portrait and sculpture of Baroness Betty Boothroyd, who was the first (and only thus far) female Speaker of the House of Commons from 1992-2000.

On 14 May 2014, a special session of Parliament was held in the Boothroyd Room, Porticullis House, London. The session was titled “Missions to the Moon: Parliamentary Update on Lunar Science and Exploration.”

Several former students and postdocs from the Center for Lunar Science and Exploration (CLSE) were invited to attend “Missions to the Moon,” an update to the UK Parliamentarians on the global resurgence of interest in lunar science and exploration.

The event looked at the UK’s role in lunar exploration and science in the context of the Global Exploration Roadmap – how to exploit current capabilities and develop new ones to play the fullest part in this new space age.

The key issues that speakers addressed were the developments being led by UK scientists in the field of lunar science and exploration, the benefits to the UK economy of actively pursuing a lunar exploration program and the inspiration it will provide to the next generation of scientists and engineers. An exciting line up of speakers shared their knowledge and passion on space and planetary science with MPs and Peers.

Several former students and postdocs from the Center for Lunar Science and Exploration’s (CLSE’s) NLSI program were in attendance, reflecting, in part, the success of our training program and the international partnerships inherent in NLSI. Their attendance also reflects the young scientists’ strong interest in a vibrant lunar science and exploration program.

Attendance by former students and postdocs reflects, in part, the success of the NLSI training program and international partnerships. Their attendance also reflects the young scientists’ strong interest in a vibrant lunar science and exploration program. Keep up the good work students!

Posted by: Soderman/SSERVI Staff
Source: SSERVI Team

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