Sunrise at Tycho (Click to Enlarge); Credit: NASA / GSFC / Arizona State Univ. / Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter

Tycho crater’s central peak complex casts a long, dark shadow near local sunrise in this spectacular lunarscape. The dramatic oblique view was recorded on June 10 by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. Shown in amazing detail, boulder strewn slopes and jagged shadows appear in the highest resolution version at 1.5 meters per pixel. The rugged complex is about 15 kilometers wide, formed in uplift by the giant impact that created the well-known ray crater 100 million years ago. The summit of its central peak reaches 2 kilometers above the Tycho crater floor.

The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) has provided some of the most detailed images of the Moon since the days of Apollo. Its suite of seven instruments has taken detailed measurements of the lunar environment using many wavelengths of light and the Lunar Orbiter Laster Altimeter, or LOLA, has produced a detailed 3D map of the lunar surface. With LRO data you can even see the landing sites and footsteps from the Apollo missions.

Posted by: Soderman/NLSI Staff
Source: http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/

Posted: Jul 6, 02:49 pm

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