change_3_4panel1
Four LROC NAC views of the Chang’e 3 landing site: A) before landing, 30 June 2013, B) after landing, 25 December 2013, C) 21 January 2014, D) 17 February 2014. Each image is enlarged by a factor of two, width of each is 200 meters (656 feet). Follow Yutu’s path clockwise around the lander in panel D [Credit: NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University].

Chang’e 3 landed on Mare Imbrium (Sea of Rains) on 14 December 2013. LROC has now imaged the lander and rover three times: 25 December 2013 (M1142582775R), 21 January 2014 (M1144936321L), and 17 February 2014 (M1147290066R). From month-to-month the solar incidence angle decreased steadily from 77° to 45° (incidence angle at sunset is 90°); due to the latitude of the site (44.1214°N, 340.4884°E, -2630 meters elevation) the incidence angle cannot get much smaller. Solar incidence angle is a measure of the Sun above the horizon; at noon on the equator the Sun is overhead and the incidence angle is 0°, at dawn or dusk the incidence angle is 90°.

ChangE3-Timelapse-Feb
Four views of the Chang’e 3 landing site from before the landing until Feb 2014 [Credit: NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University].

As the Sun gets higher above the horizon, topography appears subdued and reflectance differences become more apparent. In the case of the Chang’e 3 site, with the Sun higher in the sky one can now see Yutu’s tracks (February image). In the opening image you can see Yutu about 30 meters south of the lander, then it moved to the northwest and parked 17 meters southwest of the lander. In the February image it is apparent that Yutu did not move appreciably from the January location.

After_3_M1147290066RLabeled_blownup
LROC February 2014 image of Chang’e 3 site. Blue arrow indicates Chang’e 3 lander, yellow arrow points to Yutu (rover), and white arrow marks the December location of Yutu. Yutu’s tracks can be followed clockwise around the lander to its current location. Image enlarged 2x, width 200 meters [Credit: NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University].

Owing to the lower solar incidence angle the latest NAC image better shows Yutu’s tracks and the lander engine blast zone (high reflectance) that runs north-to-south relative to the lander. Next month the solar incidence angle will again increase and subtle landforms will begin to dominate the landscape.

Read more and see a dramatic oblique view of the Chang’e 3 site in the LROC Featured Images

Posted by: Soderman/SSERVI Staff
Source: LROC Website

Tagged with:  
Share →

SSERVI Science Teams

  • Observations of the lunar impact plume from the LCROSS event

    275_2

    McMath‐Pierce telescope observed sodium (Na) emission from LCROSS impact on October 9, 2009.When the Lunar Crater Observing and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) impacted Cabeus crater on October 9th, it pitched up frozen water along with some sodium, astronomers reported today.

    According to the LCROSS team, the impact event pitched up about 660 pounds of water frozen on the bottom of the crater. NLSI researcher R. M. Killen at NASA’s Goddard Spaceflight Center reported that the plume also contained about 3.3 pounds of sodium chloride.

Inspiration Room

NLSI Inspiration Room

Did you know?

Only about 59 percent of the moon's surface is visible to us here on earth.

Read More