robot
Please email Teague Soderman with “Double Robot Guest Access” in the subject line to request driving credentials.

Please note that we are not providing virtual tours at this time. We will be offering robotic tours again in the future, likely around the next Exploration Science Forum on July 21-23, 2015. Please keep an eye on our website for future tour announcements.

NASA’s Solar System Exploration Virtual Institute (SSERVI) now has two small, low-cost robots made by Double Robotics, a local Sunnyvale company. These robots are controlled remotely and simply via an iPhone, iPad or the Chrome browser on your computer. They work like a mobile version of FaceTime, allowing the user to drive around with a live audio and video feed. Additionally, the robot’s height can be raised or lowered to simulate the remote user standing or sitting at a table.

We encourage you to interact with our new robot! Here’s how:

Step 1. If you are using a computer, make sure you have installed the Google Chrome Browser (version 23 or later). You will also need a microphone and camera so we can see and hear you. If you are using an ipad or iphone, download and install the free Double App from iTunes.

Step 2. Email Teague Soderman with “Double Robot Guest Access” in the subject line to obtain a user name and password. Skip this step if you have already signed up on our Doodle Calendar.

Step 3. Once you have permission to operate we will send you an email; follow the link to start your session.

Step 4. Drive the Robot!

robotcontrl

Use your arrow keys to control the robot’s direction and movement (S,W,A,D keys work as well). The space bar is a keyboard shortcut to switch camera view (looking ahead, or at your feet to maneuver around tricky objects).

We look forward to hosting your tour of NASA’s Solar System Exploration Virtual Institute!

Posted by: Soderman/SSERVI Staff
Source: SSERVI

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