The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission’s Core Observatory launched from Japan’s Tanegashima Space Center on February 27, Eastern Standard Time. The joint NASA and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency effort uses the Core Observatory as the anchor of a network of international satellites designed to provide next-generation observations of rain and snow worldwide every three hours. Data from the mission will help study climate change, freshwater resources, and natural hazards such as floods, droughts, and hurricanes. Also, Monitoring California’s drought, Spacewalk mishap report, Orion test article at Langley, More Kepler planets and Hubble supernova photo!

Posted by: Soderman/SSERVI Staff
Source: NASA

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  • New rock type on the lunar farside found by NLSI Team at Brown/MIT

    2010JE003727(2)

    The farside of the Moon has always been a mystery and is only accessible by spacecraft. New compositional information from the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) onboard Chandrayaan‐1 has identified a suite of highly unusual rock types exposed at small areas within the farside Moscoviense Basin. M3 is a state‐of‐the art visible and near‐infrared imaging spectrometer that was a guest instrument on Chandrayaan‐1, the Indian Space Research Organization’s (ISRO) first mission to the Moon. The instrument is designed to measure accurately the diagnostic mineral absorption bands of solar radiation reflected from the lunar surface.

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NLSI Inspiration Room

Did you know?

If you weigh 120 pounds, you would weigh only 20 pounds on the moon.

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