NASA’s Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute takes great pride in the annual student poster competition.

The Student Poster Competition provides motivation, encouragement, and most of all, recognition to the most promising scientists of the future. Students presented posters at the Exploration Science Forum, July 21-23, 2015, at Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA.

The contest was very competitive with high-quality submissions. Selection criteria included the originality of the research, quality and clarity of the presentation—including accessibility to the non-expert, and impact to science and exploration. 1st, 2nd and 3rd place winners and honorable mention received a $1000 travel grant. Selections were made by votes of a committee of scientists and SSERVI management.

The 2015 NASA Exploration Science Forum Student Poster Competition winners were:

Honorable Mention awarded to James T. Keane for the poster “Hidden in the Neutrons: Physical Evidence for Lunar True Polar Wander”

Third Place awarded to Bellaire High School for the poster “Hypothesizing the Existence of Zhuque Family in the 5:2 Kirkwood Gap”

Second Place (Tie) awarded to Christopher Womack for the poster “Design and Development of the Telerobotic Simulation System for Teleoperated Rovers on the Moon”

Second Place (Tie) awarded to Nate Marx for the poster “Testing Remote Control for Teleoperated Rovers using Telerobotic Simulation System (TSS)”

Second Place (Tie) awarded to Ben Hockman for the poster “Spacecraft/Rover Hybrids for the Exploration of Small Solar System Bodies”

First place awarded to Heidi Fuqua for the poster “Isolating Electromagnetic Induction from the Lunar Interior measured with ARTEMIS”

Congratulations to these winners and to everyone who participated in the competition. We look forward to seeing additional innovative student research in the next Student Poster Competition!

Posted by: Soderman/SSERVI Staff
Source: SSERVI

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