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Each year, the SSERVI Central Office sponsors student travel awards to the Lunar Exploration Analysis Group (LEAG) meeting. This year’s Bernard Ray Hawke Next Lunar Generation Career Development Award went to:

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Prasun Mahanti of Arizona State University

and

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Nathan Otten of Carnegie Mellon University.

Congratulations to these outstanding early career researchers!

About the B. Ray Hawke Award
Dr. B. Ray Hawke of the University of Hawaii was a pillar of the lunar exploration community. Dr. Hawke did pioneering work integrating results from Apollo samples with remote sensing results and, more recently, was a valuable member of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter science team. As an educator, Dr. Hawke taught and mentored students at the University of Hawaii and around the world. Dr. Hawke was a fearless advocate for lunar exploration and worked tirelessly to promote lunar activities and lay the intellectual foundation for a lunar outpost.

The LEAG Bernard Ray Hawke Next Lunar Generation Career Development Award, sponsored by SSERVI, honors his legacy of scientific achievement, exploration advocacy, and mentorship by providing travel support for early career researchers who submit a first-author abstract to attend the annual LEAG meeting, and in so doing, help these early career researchers grow as productive members of the lunar exploration community.

Posted by: Soderman/SSERVI Staff
Source: SSERVI/LEAG

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