NASA’s Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute takes great pride in the annual student poster competition.

The Student Poster Competition provides motivation, encouragement, and most of all, recognition to the most promising scientists of the future. Students presented posters at the Exploration Science Forum, July 20-22, 2016, at Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA.

The contest was very competitive with more than 25 high-quality submissions. Selection criteria included the originality of the research, quality and clarity of the presentation—including accessibility to the non-expert, and impact to science and exploration. 1st, 2nd and 3rd place winners and honorable mention received a $1000 travel grant. Selections were made by votes of a committee of scientists and SSERVI management.

The 2016 NASA Exploration Science Forum Student Poster Competition winners were:

Honorable Mention awarded to Kickapoo High School (Mikala Garnier, Jonas Eschenfelder, Alysa Fintel) for the poster “Excavation Depths as Indications of Magnesium Spinel Formation via Impact Melting.”

Third Place awarded to Commack High School ( Mike Delmonaco, Trevor Rosenlicht, Nicole LaReddola) for the poster “Resolving the Primary Mechanism Causing Floor-Fractured Craters Using GRAIL and LOLA Data.”

3rd
Andrew Shaner accepts awards on behalf of the CLSE team (PI Kring).

Second Place awarded to Anastasia Newheart for the poster “Apollo ALSEP/SIDE Observations of Stairstep Flux Profiles in the Terrestrial Magnetotail.”
2nd
Anastasia Newheart accepts her Second Place Award.

First place awarded to Yasvanth Poondla for the poster “Modeling the LCROSS Impact Plume-Photodissociation and Sublimation of Water.”
1st
Yasvanth Poondla accepts his First Place Award.

Congratulations to these winners and to everyone who participated in the competition. We look forward to seeing additional innovative student research in the next Student Poster Competition!

Posted by: Soderman/SSERVI Staff
Source: SSERVI

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