SSERVI is seeking nominees for the following awards:

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Nominations for 2015 will be accepted through March 31st at sservi.nasa.gov/awards/

Shoemaker Award
The Shoemaker Distinguished Scientist Medal is an annual award given by NASA’s Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) to a scientist who has significantly contributed to the field of lunar and/or asteroid science throughout the course of their scientific career. The prize is presented and an invited lecture is given at the annual Exploration Science Forum held each July at NASA Ames Research Center. The first Shoemaker award was given posthumously to Eugene Shoemaker in 2009. The medal was presented to Eugene’s wife and scientific collaborator, Carolyn Shoemaker. The award includes a framed certificate and a medal with the Shakespearian quote “And he will make the face of heaven so fine, that all the world will be in love with night.”

Call for Nominations
The Director of SSERVI is responsible for selecting the recipients of the Shoemaker Medal. Recommendations from the community are strongly encouraged. The prize is open to the entire science community, including SSERVI team members and Principal Investigators. Nominations for the medal are welcome from anyone at any time, but should be submitted no later than March 31 for consideration in that calendar year. The nomination should summarize the contributions of the nominee and clearly state the qualifications and rationale for their selection (500 words; weblinks may amend the nomination). Nominees should be relatively senior scientists who have significantly contributed to advancements in lunar and/or asteroid studies, including research that relates the Moon, the Moons of Mars, or near-Earth asteroids. Advancements in our understanding of relevant comparative planetology issues can also be submitted to strengthen a nomination. The recipients do not need to reside in the U.S. or be a U.S. citizen.

Past Shoemaker Award Winners:
2009 – Eugene Shoemaker
2010 – Donald E. Wilhelms
2011 – G. Jeffrey Taylor
2012 – Stuart Ross Taylor
2013 – William K. Hartmann
2014 – Paul Spudis

About Eugene Shoemaker:
Dr. Eugene Shoemaker (1928-1997), a pioneer of lunar and planetary geoscience, inspired a generation of researchers studying the Solar System. During a long, highly productive, career with the U.S. Geological Survey in California and Arizona, he maintained close associations with NASA and Caltech. His earliest work was at Meteor Crater, where he analyzed in detail the formation process for impact craters. From there it was a logical step to lunar research, and to a senior science advisory position with the Apollo program. Gene used the extensive lunar data obtained by Apollo as a stepping-stone to illuminate broader issues in planetary science. He was especially interested in using cratering rates to develop consistent chronologies for the Moon, the Earth, and the inner planets. To obtain critical data on contemporary impact rates, he retrained himself in observational astronomy and devoted many years to asteroid and comet hunting, becoming an expert on the Near Earth Asteroids. Gene also played a lead role in identifying and quantifying the hazard to Earth from impacts by comets and asteroids. As a member of the Imaging Science Teams on the Voyager and Galileo missions, he extended this work to the numerous moons of the outer planets. Gene never forgot his roots in field geology, and in the last years of his life he devoted energy and enthusiasm to discovering and characterizing impact craters on Earth. He is a shining example for the Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute, whose teams study not only the Moon, the Moons of Mars, and near-Earth asteroids, but also collaborate across exploration and scientific disciplines to understand the nature and history of the planetary system in which we live.

Susan Mahan Niebur Early Career Award
The Susan Mahan Niebur Early Career Award is an annual award given by NASA’s Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) to a young scientist who has made significant contributions to the science or exploration communities. The prize is presented, along with an invited lecture, at the annual Exploration Science Forum held each July at NASA Ames Research Center.
Past Winners:

2014 – Simone Marchi
2014 – Katherine Joy

Call for Nominations:
The Director of SSERVI is responsible for selecting the recipients of the Susan Mahan Niebur Early Career Award. Recommendations from the community are strongly encouraged. The award is open to early career researchers, including SSERVI teams. Nominations for the award are welcome at any time, but should be submitted no later than March 31st for consideration in that calendar year. The nomination should summarize the contributions of the nominee and clearly state the qualifications and rationale for their selection (500 words; weblinks may amend the nomination). Nominees should be researchers who are ten years out or less from their PhD, who have shown excellence in their field or demonstrated meaningful contributions to the science or exploration communities. The recipients do not need reside in the U.S. or be a U.S. citizen. Unselected nominees will become candidates for future consideration.

About Susan Mahan Niebur:
Trained as an astrophysicist, Susan Mahan Niebur (1978-2012) was a former Discovery Program Scientist at NASA. Niebur went to NASA Headquarters straight out of graduate school as a Presidential Management Intern in what is now NASA’s Science Mission Directorate. She worked at NASA Headquarters for 5 years and initiated the first ever Early Career Fellowship and the annual Early Career Workshop to help new planetary scientists break into the field. Her focus on the special challenges faced by young researchers was acknowledged in 2011 with the Public Service Award from the NASA Planetary Science Division for her “exemplary leadership abilities [that] have helped many women in the field, both planetary and astrophysics.” Her research was complemented by her outreach efforts, which included a series of interviews and community-building at Women in Planetary Science. Niebur was a shining example of courage. She shared honesty and showed hope in the most difficult of predicaments. Susan’s mantra was “All that survives after our death are publications and people. So look carefully after the words you write, the thoughts and publications you create, and how you love others. For these are the only things that will remain.” She will be remembered for her untiring work at bringing people together and finding ways to help everyone live up to their potential; for the passion and incredible energy she brought to everything she did; for the constant encouragement and inspiration she provided to others; and for her wonderful and unfailing smile.

Michael J. Wargo Award
The Wargo Exploration Science Award is an annual award given by NASA’s Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) to a scientist or engineer who has significantly contributed to the integration of exploration and planetary science throughout their career. The prize is presented, along with an invited lecture, at the annual Exploration Science Forum held each July at NASA Ames Research Center. The award includes a statuette with the latin phrase, “Scientia facultas explorationis. Exploratio facultas scientiae.”

Past Winners:
2014 – Michael J. Wargo, received by Ms. Adele Morrissette

Call for Nominations
The Director of SSERVI is responsible for selecting the recipients of the Wargo Award. Recommendations from the community are strongly encouraged. The award is open to all members of the science and exploration communities, including SSERVI teams and their Principal Investigators. Nominations for the medal are welcome at any time, but should be submitted no later than March 31 for consideration in that calendar year. The nomination should summarize the contributions of the nominee and clearly state the qualifications and rationale for their selection (500 words; weblinks may amend the nomination). Nominees should be relatively senior scientists or engineers who have demonstrated their commitment to the integration of science and exploration through research related to the Moon, the Moons of Mars, or Near Earth Asteroids. Advancements in our understanding of science drivers for human exploration of any destination can also be submitted to strengthen a nomination. The recipients do not need reside in the U.S. or be a U.S. citizen. Unselected nominees will become candidates for future consideration.

About Michael Wargo:
Dr. Michael Wargo (1951-2013) was an outgoing and strong advocate for the integration of science, engineering and technology. As a professor at MIT, he was awarded the John Wulff Award for Excellence in Teaching and the Hugh Hampton Young Memorial Fund prize for exhibiting leadership and creativity while maintaining exceptionally broad and interdisciplinary interests. In a nearly two-decade career at NASA, he received numerous awards including NASA’s Exceptional Service Medal and seven group achievement awards.

Serving as Chief Exploration Scientist for NASA’s Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate, Mike worked closely with planetary researchers, especially in the lunar and Mars science communities, to develop collaborative and highly productive missions. As a scientific member of many lunar missions, including the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter and the LCROSS satellite, Mike helped map resources for human missions to the Moon and participated in the discovery of ice in the shadows of lunar craters. He was a member of the team planning the next robotic mission to Mars in 2020 and worked gathering crucial scientific information needed to allow humans to be sent safely to the moon, Mars and near-Earth asteroids. Much of his work has helped develop a “roadmap” for human and robotic space exploration for the next two decades.

Mike served as the Executive Secretary of LEAG and championed the Moon at NASA Headquarters for several years. He provided guidance and insight to the direction of the NASA Lunar Science Institute and the creation of NASA’s Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute. His encyclopedic knowledge of science and exploration issues related to human spaceflight was legendary, and he freely advised the next generation of planetary scientists and engineers. Mike was a shining example of collaboration and open communication that has inspired many scientists and engineers.

Posted by: Soderman/SSERVI Staff
Source: SSERVI

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