NASA experts will discuss and answer public questions about Comet C/2020 F3 NEOWISE during a broadcast of NASA Science Live and follow up media teleconference on Wednesday, July 15. The comet is visible with the naked-eye in the early morning sky and starting this week, after sunset.

IMG_1282
View of comet NEOWISE. Credit: Greg Schmidt. Imaged with a Canon DSLR with 15 sec exposure at f/5.6, ISO 1600. No guiding, just a tripod and cable release to minimize vibration. The comet is now comfortably in the evening sky in the NW, so no need to get up at 4:30am! Point and shoot cameras should be able to capture decent quality pictures of the comet. Good luck!

The NASA Science Live episode will air live at 3 p.m. EDT Wednesday on NASA Television and the agency’s website, along with Facebook Live, YouTube, Periscope, LinkedIn, Twitch, and USTREAM.

Viewers can submit questions on Twitter using the hashtag #AskNASA or by leaving a comment in the chat section of Facebook, Periscope, or YouTube.

NASA will follow the broadcast with a media teleconference at 4 p.m. Wednesday. The media teleconference audio will stream live at:

https://www.nasa.gov/live

The teleconference participants include:

* Lindley Johnson, planetary defense officer and program executive of NASA’s Planetary Defense Coordination Office, NASA Headquarters
* Emily Kramer, co-investigator on the Near-Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (NEOWISE) science team, NASA JPL
* Amy Mainzer, NEOWISE principal investigator, University of Arizona
To participate in the teleconference, media must email their name and affiliation to joshua.a.handal@nasa.gov by 3:45 p.m. Wednesday, July 15.

For information about NASA’s Planetary Defense Coordination Office, including its Near-Earth Object Observation Program, visit:

https://www.nasa.gov/planetarydefense

Posted by: Soderman/SSERVI Staff
Source: NASA

Share →

LunGradCon 2021

LunGradCon Graphic

LSSW – Virtual

Upcoming Events

Check back soon!

SSERVI Team Science

Did you know?

It is colder inside some craters near the lunar poles than it is on the surface of Pluto (25K, or -415F).

Read More