SSERVI PI Mihaly Horanyi of the Institute for Modeling Plasma, Atmospheres and Cosmic Dust (IMPACT) team at the University of Colorado, appeared in an article in the New York Times.

In the nine years that NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft has spent zooming toward Pluto, most of the seven instruments aboard the piano-size probe have been in hibernation, waiting for their chance to plumb the mysteries of our solar system. One, however, has been collecting and pinging back data all this time, a tireless worker with a taste for dust.

The instrument, known as the Venetia Burney Student Dust Counter, was created at the University of Colorado, Boulder, by a small group of students in physics, mechanical engineering, aeronautics and astrophysical sciences.

Continue reading the full New York Times article.

Posted by: Soderman/SSERVI Staff
Source: LAURA PARKER/New York Times

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