SSERVI’s 2010 Shoemaker awardee, Don Wilhelms, was recently recognized with a new mineral name, donwilhelmsite, which has the chemical formula CaAl4Si2O11.

Don was a USGS Flagstaff geologist who wrote two very important books: (a) The Geologic History of the Moon, USGS Prof. Paper 1348, which is a professional paper about lunar stratigraphy, and (b) To a Rocky Moon, which is a historical popular science book about the geologic decisions made for the Apollo missions.

IMA No. 2018-113
Donwilhelmsite
CaAl4Si2O11
In the lunar meteorite Oued Awlitis 001, found on January 15, 2014 in the Boujdour Province, Laâyoune-Sakia El Hamra Region, Western Sahara (25.954°N, 12.493°W)

Jörg Fritz*, Ansgar Greshake, Mariana Klementova, Richard Wirth, Lukas Palatinus, Vera Assis Fernandes, Ute Böttger and Ludovic Ferrière
*E-mail: joerg.fritz@kino-heppenheim.de

Mineral Details:
Structurally related to zagamiite
Hexagonal: P63/mmc; structure determined a = 5.44(1), c = 12.76(3) Å
X-ray powder diffraction pattern not available
Type material is deposited in the mineralogical collections of the Naturhistorisches Museum Wien, Burgring 7, 1010 Wien, Austria, catalogue no. NHMW-O104

The reference for the new mineral is:
Fritz, J., Greshake, A., Klementova, M., Wirth, R., Palatinus, L., Assis Fernandes, V., Böttger, U. and Ferrière, L. (2019) Donwilhelmsite, IMA 2018-113. CNMNC Newsletter No. 47, February 2019, page 145; Mineralogical Magazine, 83, 143–147

Posted by: Soderman/SSERVI Staff
Source: Mineralogical Magazine/SSERVI Team

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