In 2015, NASA will be recognizing 50 years of spacewalking, or Extravehicular Activity (EVA). Throughout the year, NASA will be celebrating accomplishments such as these with a look towards the future. Spacewalking enhances our exploration capabilities and enables humans to go deeper into the solar system in part by suiting up.

Two important dates to remember are March 18, the anniversary of the first spacewalk by Soviet cosmonaut Alexei Leonov, who left his Voskhod-2 vehicle for a 12-minute tethered walk, and June 3, when NASA’s Ed White exited his Gemini-4 capsule using a hand-held oxygen jet gun to push himself from the hatch for a 23-minute tethered spacewalk.

So, #SuitUp with us throughout the year and join us for the #JourneytoMars.


Interview with NASA astronauts Stan Love and Steve Bowen, conducted during a Neutral Buoyancy Lab test run of the MACES spacesuit being developed for spacewalks on an asteroid exploration mission—the astronauts spoke with NASA commentator Pat Ryan live from underwater about NASA’s plans for exploring an asteroid and developing the tools needed to support that plan. Credit: NASA


A look at the history, evolution and future of Extravehicular Activity, also known as spacewalking. Hear from NASA team members who took part in making this complex task a reality, enabling some of the most impressive and daring achievements in the history of human spaceflight. Credit: NASA

For more information: http://www.nasa.gov/suitup/

Posted by: Soderman/SSERVI Staff
Source: NASA

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