Loading Events

« All Events

  • This event has passed.

Ian Garrick-Bethell: Lunar crustal magnetic anomalies and associated albedo features

February 9, 2011 @ 3:00 pm PDT

Thank you to all who joined the NASA Lunar Science Institute Afternoon Seminar Series. You can view this talk here.

Please join the NASA Lunar Science Institute for our occasional Afternoon Seminar Series.. The next seminar will be on Wednesday, February 9, 2011 at 3:00pm PST, 21:00 GMT (UTC-8).

TOPIC

Lunar crustal magnetic anomalies and associated albedo features

SPEAKER: Ian Garrick-Bethell (University of California, Santa Cruz)

OVERVIEW

The origin of regions of strongly magnetized crust remains a significant open problem in lunar science. Magnetized crust may provide insight into the past history of a lunar dynamo, or the existence of transient magnetic fields produced by impacts. However, magnetized crust is also interesting for another reason: some magnetized regions are associated with very unusual albedo patterns on the lunar surface. I will present our current understanding of magnetic anomalies, as well as two competing theories for the formation of their associated albedo patterns.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY

Ian Garrick-Bethell is an assistant professor at the University of California, Santa Cruz. His research interests are in lunar magnetism and lunar crustal structure.

HOW TO PARTICIPATE:

TO JOIN USING A VIDEOCONFERENCING SYSTEM:

Please RSVP to Ricky Guest (Ricky.Guest@nasa.gov) if you will be joining by

Polycom.

TO JOIN USING A WEB BROWSER:

The slides and audio/video for this meeting will be presented using Adobe

Connect. To join the meeting, connect to:

http://connect.arc.nasa.gov/nlsi_director_seminars/

Posted: Feb 3, 03:21 pm

Details

Date:
February 9, 2011
Time:
3:00 pm PDT
Event Tags:
,

NESF2020 – Virtual

LSSW – Virtual

Lunar Landing Workshop

Upcoming Events

October


71st IAC
Oct 12-16 (Dubai, United Arab Emirates)

2020 SACNAS
Oct 22-24 (Long Beach, CA)

2020 DPS Meeting
Oct 25-30 (Spokane, WA)

View More Upcoming
View Past Events

SSERVI Team Science

Did you know?

Moonquakes have been measured by seismometers emplaced by the Apollo astronauts.

Read More