Curiosity has been on the move. In this most recent HiRISE image of the MSL rover, the tracks are visible from Yellowknife Bay to its location on 11 December 2013, several kilometers to the southwest. Tracks from its landing site to Yellowknife Bay made more than a year ago are faded but still discernible.

The enhanced color image shows where the tracks cross the narrow (1-kilometer wide) color swath of HiRISE. A black-and-white image subimage shows the rover itself. Rather than follow a straight path to its next destination, the rover has zig-zagged to avoid steep slopes.

Curiosity is progressing from the bright dust-covered area to a region with a darker surface, where saltating sand keeps the surface relatively free of dust. The scenery seen by the rover will be getting more interesting as it progresses toward Mount Sharp.

Posted by: Soderman/SSERVI Staff
Source: Alfred McEwen/Tre Gibbs; http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/ESP_034572_1755

Share →

NESF 2019

ISRU 2019

Lunar Landing Workshop

SSERVI Team Science

  • Paul Spudis to Receive Columbia Medal

    6-9-16_Spudis

    Spudis was selected for his outstanding service as a geologist specializing in the terrestrial planets, with extensive background in geology and planetary science.

Did you know?

Only about 59 percent of the moon's surface is visible to us here on earth.

Read More