The Center for Lunar Science and Exploration (CLSE) at the Lunar and Planetary Institute and NASA’s Johnson Space Center is looking for 10 teams of highly motivated high school students and their teachers to participate in a national standards-based, lunar/asteroid research program for the 2015-2016 academic year. CLSE is one of nine members of the NASA Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI).

The Exploration of the Moon and Asteroids by Secondary Students (ExMASS) program is an academic year-long, national standards-based lunar/asteroid research program that envelops students in the process of science. Supervised by their teachers and advised by a scientist, teams undertake student-led, open-inquiry research projects. At the end of the year, four teams compete for a chance to present their research at the NASA Exploration Science Forum held at the NASA Ames Research Center in July 2016.

Participation in the ExMASS program is free. Interested teachers should complete the online application at http://www.lpi.usra.edu/education/exmass2015/application/. Applications are due April 19, 2015. Selected teachers will be notified no later than May 1, 2015.

For more information, and to apply for the ExMASS program, visit http://www.lpi.usra.edu/exploration/education/hsResearch/. For questions, please visit the ExMASS FAQ page or contact Andy Shaner.

Posted by: Soderman/SSERVI staff
Source: SSERVI team

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