It was just over three years ago that the Moon lost one of its greatest friends with the death of B. Ray Hawke (revisit the B. Ray Hawke memorial page)

Dr. B. Ray Hawke of the University of Hawaii was a pillar of the lunar exploration community. Dr. Hawke did pioneering work integrating results from Apollo samples with remote sensing results and, more recently, was a valuable member of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter science team. As an educator, Dr. Hawke taught and mentored students at the University of Hawaii and around the world. Dr. Hawke was a fearless advocate for lunar exploration and worked tirelessly to promote lunar activities and lay the intellectual foundation for a lunar outpost.

The International Astronomical Union has approved the name “Hawke” for a 13-km crater just north of the Schrodinger basin. As befits B. Ray’s research interests, the crater contains some impact melt, and it is a fresh, rayed crater.

Read the full announcement on the USGS Planetary Nomenclature page.

About the B. Ray Hawke Award

In 2016, SSERVI created the Bernard Ray Hawke Next Lunar Generation Career Development Award to sponsor student travel to Lunar Exploration Analysis Group (LEAG) meetings.

The LEAG Bernard Ray Hawke Next Lunar Generation Career Development Award, sponsored by SSERVI, honors his legacy of scientific achievement, exploration advocacy, and mentorship by providing travel support for early career researchers who submit a first-author abstract to attend the annual LEAG meeting, and in so doing, help these early career researchers grow as productive members of the lunar exploration community. Contact Brad Bailey for more information.

Posted by: Soderman/SSERVI Staff
Source: Lunar-L

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