NASA hosted a media teleconference at 12:30 p.m. EST on Monday, Jan. 27, to discuss the Lunar Cargo Transportation and Landing by Soft Touchdown (Lunar CATALYST) initiative. Participants included Jason Crusan, director of Advanced Exploration Systems, NASA Headquarters, and Nantel Suzuki, Robotic Lunar Lander program executive, NASA Headquarters.

Through Lunar CATALYST, announced on Jan. 16, NASA seeks proposals to partner in the development of reliable and cost-effective commercial robotic lunar lander capabilities that will enable the delivery of payloads to the lunar surface. Such capabilities could support commercial activities on the moon while enabling new science and exploration missions of interest to NASA and the larger scientific and academic communities.

The Advanced Exploration Systems Division in NASA’s Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate manages Lunar CATALYST. Advanced Exploration Systems pioneers new approaches for rapidly developing prototype systems, demonstrating key capabilities and validating operational concepts for future human missions beyond Earth orbit.

View the Lunar CATALYST Announcement for Proposals

For more information about Lunar CATALYST and the pre-proposal teleconference for the U.S. private sector, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/lunarcatalyst

Audio of the media teleconference will be streamed live on NASA’s website at:

http://www.nasa.gov/newsaudio

Posted by: Soderman/SSERVI staff
Source: NASA

Share →

Carbon Workshop

ELS 2018

NESF 2018

Lunar Landing Workshop

Upcoming Events

June 2018


American Astronomical Society
June 3-7 (Denver, CO)

Asia Oceania Geosciences Society
June 3-8 (Honolulu, HI)

Cryovolcanism in the Solar System Workshop
June 5-7 (Houston, TX)

International Symposium on Lunar & Planetary Science 2018
June 11-13 (Macau, China)

Workshop in Geology and Geophysics of the Solar System
June 23- July 1 (Petnica Science Center, Petnica, Serbia)

Exploration Science Forum
June 26-28 (NASA Ames)
View More Upcoming
View Past Events

SSERVI Team Science

Did you know?

The Moon is 4.5 billion years old.

Read More