See pictures of this amazing event!The weather in San Jose, California was a little better than expected for viewing the total lunar eclipse last night. It was still pretty cloudy, but NLSI’s Brian Day was able to grab a few shots through holes in the clouds.

A total lunar eclipse takes place whenever the moon passes right through the Earth’s dark umbral shadow. This can only happen at full moon, which is when the moon has swung directly opposite the sun in our sky, and when the fully illuminated hemisphere of the moon (day side) shines brightly in our night sky. There is a full moon every month.

See pictures of this amazing event!The weather in San Jose, California was a little better than expected for viewing the total lunar eclipse last night. It was still pretty cloudy, but NLSI’s Brian Day was able to grab a few shots through holes in the clouds.

A total lunar eclipse takes place whenever the moon passes right through the Earth’s dark umbral shadow. This can only happen at full moon, which is when the moon has swung directly opposite the sun in our sky, and when the fully illuminated hemisphere of the moon (day side) shines brightly in our night sky. There is a full moon every month. But – several times each year – the Earth, sun and moon line up exactly. Then the body of the moon may pass in front of the sun, creating a solar eclipse. Or – as on the night of December 20/21 – the Earth passes in front of the sun as seen from the moon. At such times, Earth’s shadow falls on the moon’s face.

The last time the total lunar eclipse fell on the same date as the December solstice (by Universal Time) was on December 21, 1638!


2010 Total Lunar Eclipse. Credit: Brian Day. Click to enlarge.


2010 Total Lunar Eclipse. Credit: Brian Day. Click to enlarge.


2010 Total Lunar Eclipse. Credit: Brian Day. Click to enlarge.


2010 Total Lunar Eclipse. Credit: Brian Day. Click to enlarge.

Posted by: Soderman/NLSI Staff
Source: NLSI

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